'Chateau Antoinette' by Mulvany & Rogers

Kevin Mulvany and Susie Rogers of Mulvany & Rogers have created a fabulous miniature palace called "Chateau Antoinette." Created for an American collector with a passion for Marie Antoinette, the miniature takes elements from Versailles Palace, the Chateau de Bagatelle and the Palace of Fontainebleau.

The chateau has six rooms and measures 42 inches high, 67 inches wide and 20 inches deep. Only the finest miniatures and materials were used - real crystal and gold, luxury woods, sterling silver. The table is set with porcelain Sevres plates, real glass goblets, and sterling silver cutlery. The walls are decorated with 22-carat gold leaf and tiny oil paintings. Over 10,000 hours of work went into creating the masterpiece.

Mulvany and Rogers have been making miniatures for over 25 years and are known for their miniature recreations of real castles and mansions. Based in Holt, Wiltshire, England, they travel around the world researching their projects. They are exacting about the details, even including fireplace soot and dust in the corners of rooms.

"The mood, the lighting, wear and tear are all considered. It all counts to making a true replica," says Susie.

See more photos and read the full article about Chateau Antoinette.


5 comments:

Linda Carswell said...

Thank you so much for the'link' Grace...it is absolutely wonderful. I have their book and love their wonderful creations, but this one is breath taking!!

Linda

Peach Blossom Hill said...

So beautiful and I can't even get Joanna's dollhouse wired and finished! I want their book some time.

Jody

TreeFeathers said...

I know what you mean, Jody, there just never seems to be enough time! I'm in awe of people who can projects like that completed.

I'd love to have their book, too!

- Grace

muriel.amouroux said...

It is absolutely marvellous!!!!
Muriellisa
www.montoutpetitmonde.kazeo.com

miniaturist59 said...

HOLY Sh*T!!!!!!!!!!!!!! That's all I can say. Flabbergasted, Grace!!

 

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